putthison:

While people generally adhere to group norms for fear of disapproval or reprimand, anecdotal evidence and the occasional study suggest that high-status folk feel free to break rules—by eating with their mouths open, violating traffic laws, and expressing unpopular opinions. But how is nonconformity interpreted by others? Do we see it as a sign of status? New research, to be published next near in The Journal of Consumer Research, suggests that we do. The authors call the phenomenon the “red sneakers effect,” after one of them taught a class at Harvard Business School in her red Converse.

The New Yorker: Why Mark Zuckerburg Gets Away With Hoodies

blech:

A time for sharing (government content on Facebook and Twitter):

This is a feature that colleagues in a handful of departments have repeatedly asked for. We thank them for their patience. We prioritise rigorously based on evidence of user need, and this particular feature has been queued for a long time because zero end users have ever requested it, and all users in several rounds of guerrilla testing were able to share GOV.UK links to social networks easily by copying and pasting them.
 Passive aggressive blog post of the day.