Before yesterday, The Oculus Rift was technofetish gear. It ceased to be so in an instant. [..] I used the shitty, old Rift, and I thought I was underwater. Think of every corner they had to cut because they were trying to make this thing in the finite realm of men. Now imagine the corners restored, and the corner cutting machine in ruins.

“Spite-driven development,” declares Nicholas, the other two nodding immediately. I ask them to explain, and Daniel gives me an example. Let’s say he wants rabbits in the game – as the programmer it’s not really within his powers to make this happen. So, he says, he’ll use his poor artistic skills to draw something like a rabbit on the office whiteboard, take a photo, put it on his computer and crop it out, and put that square flat drawing into the game. On seeing this, says David with a look on his face that entirely confirms this isn’t hypothetical, he’ll be so horrified that he’ll be forced to draw a proper one to replace it.

Different locales also return different versions of the same symbol. The US locale (en_US) returns a full-width ¥ symbol, where as the Japan locale (ja_JP) returns a regular ¥ symbol. Similarly, the French locale (fr_FR) will return a non-breaking space between the digits and the symbol, where as the French Canadian locale (fr_CA) which formats numbers the same way (“15,00 $NZ”, like above) uses a regular space.

You can’t roll out a syrup-drenched waffle filled with bacon and eggs under the slogan “Live More”. You just can’t.

We were having the staff play against other people. And a journalist — a game journalist, a Japanese guy — approached me and said, “Hey, check this out. I found this crazy Magic Throw with Guile.” And he showed it to me. When I first saw that, the first thing I thought was, “I have to quit. I can’t do this anymore. I think I’m gonna quit my job.”

People taking bugs more seriously than I do on Street Fighter 2: An Oral History